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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 17, 2018 6:00am-8:30am BST

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hello. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. the prime minister is to face questions from caribbean leaders over the uk's treatment of thousands of commonwealth migrants. the meeting comes after the home secretary was forced to apologise to members of the so called windrush generation, describing the government's behaviour as appalling. good morning — it's tuesday 17th april. also this morning: inside the site of the suspected chemical weapons attack in syria. we hear first hand accounts from the town of douma as russia says that international weapons inspectors will be allowed to travel there tomorrow. almost 25 years since the death of stephen lawrence, his mother doreen tells breakfast that violent crime against young black men is still not being taken seriously enough. big companies are spending millions
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of pounds to find better ways of dealing with their discarded plastic packaging. a group of scientists working here in oxford has come up with a ground breaking discovery that may help them and the environment. in sport: a tale of two super subs as andy carrol‘s dramatic late equaliser clinches it for west ham to deny stoke a precious win in their battle for premier league survival. and carol has the weather. good morning from wood free weapons in north london where we have seen the most stunning sunrise. —— woodbury wetlands. blustery showers and sunshine and then from tomorrow, it warms up that i will have more details in 15 minutes. bring on tomorrow.
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first, our main story. theresa may will seek to reassure caribbean leaders that the windrush generation — who came to britain between 1948 and 1971 — won't be deported due to paperwork issues. the government has apologised amid growing anger over revelations that thousands of people were being incorrectly identified as illegal immigrants. the prime minister is to meet other commonwealth leaders in london, as jon donnison reports. the so—called gwyn price them —— windrush generation. commonwealth migrants who came to britain as children decades ago but due to a tightening of immigration laws now say they are being treated like foreigners in their own home. people like sonia williams who came here from barbados in the 1970s when she was just 13. from barbados in the 1970s when she wasjust13. i can't from barbados in the 1970s when she wasjust 13. i can't drive, i can't work, i can't claim benefits, i can't do anything. when they took away my driving licence in 2016 i started to put it together and i
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thought, this is all connected and they are saying i'm illegal immigrants. as commonwealth leaders gather in london for a summit, the prime minister has reversed a decision not to discuss the issue with them. but only after her home secretary was forced to apologise.” do not want any of the commonwealth citizens who are here legally to be impacted in the way they have an frankly, some of the way they have been treated has been wrong, has been treated has been wrong, has been appalling and i am sorry. citizens of the british empire coming to the mother country with good intent. 70 years after the first of the windrush generation arrived, the government has now promised to resolve all disputed cases within two weeks. john donnison, bbc news. let's get the latest on syria now, and russia says that inspectors from the chemical weapons watchdog will be allowed to visit the site of a suspected gas attack in douma tomorrow. when they arrive
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at the site they are expected to gather soil and other samples to help identify which substances — if any — were used in the attack. the us has expressed concern that russia might have tampered with the site. both russia and syria deny that any chemical attack has taken place. seth doane from cbs news is one of the first western journalists to visit douma since the weekend. he was taken there by syrian government forces. from there, he has sent this report. this was rebel territory until two days ago. and today, we made it to the very house where the suspected chemical attack took place. all of a sudden, some gas spread around us. we could not breathe. it smelt like chlorine. syrian forces recaptured this area from rebels over the weekend. how did the chemicals get there?
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that means they now control this building where this video was taken. he told us how his brother tried to wash off the chemicals. how did the chemicals get here? we asked him to take us to where the missile allegedly hit. he took took us here and pointed here. we found a missile neatly resting. hundreds of thousands of civilians have been living here, many without food. you can see the desperation here, just hoping for some bread. we asked this mother of five why she didn't leave if the fighting had been so bad. "we tried more than once," she told us, "but the rebels would not let us go." nine days have already passed since the suspected chemical attack. and if weapons experts to make it to the building, they would find a scene that has been tampered with, and eyewitness accounts that can be confusing and contradictory. meanwhile, mps will continue to consider their role in approving military action, after labour leader
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jeremy corbyn criticised theresa may's decision to authorise air strikes on syria without consulting parliament. our political correspondent, alex forsyth has more. the uk's involvement in our strike since syria has divided opinion, not just drawing protest but debate as well. yesterday mps spent more than six hours discussing the military action. the prime minister was there throughout answering more than 140 questions defending her decision. let me be absolutely clear, we have acted because in our national interest to do so. it is in our national interest to prevent the further use of chemical weapons in syria and to uphold and defend the global consensus that these weapons should not be used. but the labour leader said the strikes were legally questionable and could be
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counter—productive arguing the focus should be on a political solution. this house was not only denied a vote but did not even have the opportunity to question the government in advance on the legal and evidential basis for their participation in this action. despite the lengthy and late session the debate was he did with disagreement over whether mps should have had to say before the strikes we re have had to say before the strikes were ordered. but as someone who supported military action against daesh in syria in the vote in september 2015, may i say gently to the prime minister that she should have come first to the house before committing our forces to action. the public will understand that when our forces need to act quickly and decisively and safely in concert with our allies, it must be right to authorise strikes without giving notice. when the talking stopped at 11pm, there was no binding vote but
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plenty of strong feeling and today, the debate over these crucial principles will continue. alex forsyth, bbc news, westminster. the parents of the terminally ill toddler, alfie evans, are expected to make a further legal appeal in a bid to extend his treatment. tom evans and kate james want to take alfie to rome for treatment, but doctors at alder hey children's hospital in liverpool say he's too ill. a court rejected their case yesterday but they were given 24 hours to make a further appeal. we wa nt we want them to know they can't break us and we are never going to back down. alfie and the family and all of us are stronger than ever and we will keep fighting all the way. we are here for you, alfie. the car giant vauxhall and its sister company 0pel has announced plans to scale down its franchised dealerships across the uk and europe. vauxhall was taken over by the french psa group last year. the firms says the decision
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is in response to changing consumer habits. it saw an 18 percent drop in sales of new cars in the last three months. the launch of nasa's planet—hunter known as tess has been postponed on a spacex falcon 9 rocket at around 11:30 last night. excuse me, i sneezed. apologies. but it was called off three hours before lift—off. i've got to get better at recognising your hand gestures. you are recognising your hand gestures. you a re really recognising your hand gestures. you are really good at body language but that, you failed. in all honesty, i wa nted that, you failed. in all honesty, i wanted to hear the silent sneeze again. it's one of the great things of science and nature. that was not silent, was it? a tiny bit of noise.
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scientists in portsmouth have engineered an enzyme which can digest a type of plastic used to make drinks bottles and other products, which could offer a new way of recycling. the enzyme works by breaking the plastic down. although so far it has only been found to work on the kind of material used in drinks bottles. researchers say it has opened a door to a new way of tackling plastic waste. they founded by accident, apparently. resurfacing roadworks which skirted around a parked car have been described as an "epic fail". the road in southport was completely resurfaced, apart from a section directly underneath this car. a resident said she returned from work to find the gap outside her house, and thinks the car belongs to a neighbour. sefton council said residents were warned well in advance of the resurfacing works. in fairness to the council, there are always big signs up saying, all ca i’s are always big signs up saying, all ca rs off are always big signs up saying, all
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cars off the road between seven and seven normally. we had it on our road. they will have to go back and redo it. we are talking about sport with holly. the sickener for stoke. completely. i watched the game last night up until the last few minutes andl night up until the last few minutes and i was just night up until the last few minutes and i wasjust about night up until the last few minutes and i was just about to pack up, ta ke and i was just about to pack up, take myself off to bed. never go early. it's much more exciting at the bottom of the table. and it was all wrapped up with manchester city so all wrapped up with manchester city so early, the battle is right at the bottom of the relegation zone and that's what we saw last night at this point in the season, every game does she and —— does seem crucial. it's west ham who took that much—needed point, with a 1— all draw at london's stadium. andy carroll marked his first appearance by levelling in the 90th minute. stoke remain five points from safety
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with four games to go. the chairman of the engling football league says he is robustly campaigning for safe standing. it's already in place at celtic — as you can see here, and last week the government rejected a request from west brom to trial safe standing at the hawthorns. shaun harvey says there is significant popular demand for standing to be allowed in the efl. in tennis, britain's dan evans will return to competition in glasgow later this month following his 12 month drugs ban. evans tested positive for cocaine during the barcelona 0pen last year but is free to play again after passing agreed checks by the lta. and the april showers washed out all four days of yorkshire's opening county championship match for the first time since 1967. they were supposed to be playing champions essex, the groundsman at headingley said conditions were the worst he'd seen in 30 years. it's not hard to believe at this
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time of year. april, we are still getting showers. it's been wet, it's been damp, then was out in the mud. so we have sent carroll to some wetlands. the new weather is on the way later this week. she can tell us all about it, she is at woodbury wetlands. good morning, a beautiful start to the day here in the wetlands. where are in north london. the most spectacular sunrise, lovely shades of red. this place was only opened two years ago by david attenborough. home to many birds, wildlife generally, you can hear some of the birds now. but it's a chilly start to the day. you're in the south—east, is going to be quite a warm day. pretty pleasant. at the
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moment, a weatherfront warm day. pretty pleasant. at the moment, a weather front coming warm day. pretty pleasant. at the moment, a weatherfront coming in from the west producing some rain. heavy rain overnight across northern ireland. getting across western scotland. if we for the ireland. getting across western scotland. if we for the weekend, ireland. getting across western scotland. if we for the weekend, temperatures ireland. getting across western scotland. if we for the weekend, temperatures are ireland. getting across western scotland. if we for the weekend, temperatures are above ireland. getting across western scotland. if we for the weekend, temperatures are above average. some of us will see temperatures into the mid— 20s. possibly even a little bit more. for the weekend, temperatures are above average. the papers. the main story, windrush migrants granted apology and the prime minister is backing down after a commonwealth meeting. and this is ant outside court yesterday. we will listen to what he said soon. he was saying sorry to be handed a record fine. —— sorry. the mail. ant was
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fined £86,000. that is four days' wages. some of you may have heard this already. this was him talking outside court yesterday.” this already. this was him talking outside court yesterday. i want to say i am truly sorry for what happened. high standards are expected of me and i expect them of myself. i let myself and a lot of people down. i am truly sorry and wa nt to people down. i am truly sorry and want to apologise to everyone involved in the crash. i am just thankful no one was seriously hurt. thank you very much. speaking outside court. the sun. here he is again. the times as well. and a story mentioned yesterday. russia
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has hacked into millions of computers. we will talk about this later. aplastic eating enzyme. —— a plastic. and shamefaced. ant with a record fine. we are talking to one of the people affected by the so—called windrush. amber rudd was of course talking about that yesterday. saying "we were wrong." after manchester city's victory in the premier league, a lot of conversation about the future of pep guardiola. only one season left in his three—year deal. he will apparently be offered a deal until 2020. many fans will be excited about that prospect. some are just
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saying next season. who knows? have you ever had a nickname? yes. do tell. bristol rugby have a nickname. they will be rebranded as the bristol bears, which i love, i think it's fab. we have the tigers, the sharks... it is good. there will be a bit ofa sharks... it is good. there will be a bit of a mixup with the bristol bear gay festival. but apart from that, fantastic. when are they kicking that off? the festival? no, the name. 0h! and this one is on teenagers. you have the giggles.
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this person's son was hypnotised by the beauty of nature. of course, looking at a phone. parents are posting pictures of their children surrounded by beautiful, i don't know, hills there. i don't know where this is. all looking at smartphones. a sad reflection of society. i have a great photo of my parents both sitting at dinner with both of their heads in their phones. it is notjust the children, it is also the parents. at the table! they should be banned at the table! but, you know, parents, can't stop them. you need a long and hard word with your parents. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc
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news. this sunday will mark the 25th anniversary of the murder of stephen lawrence, a crime which continues to have ramifications for british society. the organisation which came has come in for most criticism over the years is the metropolitan police. and in an exclusive interview with this programme, stephen's mother, doreen, says black victims of crime in london continue to be treated less seriously. brea kfast‘s tim muffett has been to meet her. it is such an amazing space, isn't it? it is. stephen lawrence dreamt of becoming an architect. as you walk, you think... i am meeting his mother, doreen, in the newly refurbished room of the charity in his name. he was a creative person. you started really young, all of the drawings he used to do. he had a gift, he really did. the stephen lawrence charitable trust seeks to transform the life of young people to help fulfil their ambitions.
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sometimes i think why should i bother, because i will never get into those jobs. but they can. and we wa nt into those jobs. but they can. and we want to make sure they realise that. sunday will mark the 25th anniversary of stephen lawrence's murder. he died following a racially motivated attack by a gang of youths. his death was horrendous and it marks a time when a lot of these things were happening to young black man. as we move forward, we have to see how we can change things. his death led to a change in the law. in 2012, these two were found guilty of his murder. dobson was previously acquitted during a prosecution brought by the stephen lawrence family. as things stood, you could not be retried for the same offence. the double jeopardy law was changed. someone has been charged and found not guilty, you could bring them to
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the court again. a public enquiry in 1999 heavily criticised the metropolitan police's handling of stephen lawrence's murder. key m ista kes stephen lawrence's murder. key mistakes had been made. the damning conclusion, the metropolitan police was institutionally racist. do you think police take the crime less seriously if they are black?” think police take the crime less seriously if they are black? i would say yes. when stephen lawrence was killed, his murder was not investigated when they should have done. i think how many of these cases are investigated now, it is separated into a different unit. it is not the same for young black men. they do not take it seriously. is not the same for young black men. they do not take it seriouslym they are white, it is taken more seriously? definitely. the evidence speaks for itself. in a statement, the metropolitan police said this. it added this. on sunday, a team of
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architects will run the london marathon in honour of stephen. architects will run the london marathon in honour of stephenm will be a difficult day for me as well. i want to be there to support them and to say thank you. do you ever think about what kind of man he would be now? i think about that. he could be married, have a family. he could be married, have a family. he could be married, have a family. he could be in his profession. those are the positive things i like to think about where he would be. and just to let you know, i will tell you this. there's a special three—part documentary about stephen's death which starts tonight on bbc one. it's "stephen, the murder that changed a nation," and it's on at 9pm. plastics are one of the world's biggest environmental problems, and ben's finding out what our biggest food and drinks companies are doing to improve waste from packaging. good morning. good morning. welcome
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to oxfordshire in this absolutely vast facility down here. this is the size of wembley stadium. you might wonder what this has to do with these, plus the bottles. all of the big companies, coca—cola, pepsi, they want to recycle the plastic waste. even though we recycle, we are not doing it enough. there is a limit on how much bottles can be reused. so they have come up here with an enzyme. it is a chemical which essentially will eat this plastic and break it down into its component parts. that is really important because these bottles are made up of pet, as it is known. two chemical components. if they are
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broken down, they can be reused. why do they need something this big? underneath my seat in this yellow box is a super high—speed x—ray, the speed of light, 300,000 kilometres a second. and that x—ray allows them to look at the molecules in closer detail than ever before and come up with a better way of making it faster, a faster way to break down the enzyme even more. we will speak speak to the scientists behind this later, but before that, he news, travel, and weather wherever you are watching breakfast this morning. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. once again this morning, there's news of a teenager being stabbed to death, this time in east london. the victim, believed to be aged 18, was found injured in chestnut avenue in forest gatejust before midnight. it means there's been more than one violent death in london
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every other day since the start of the year. no arrests in this latest killing have been made. a new group set up by police earlier this month to tackle the recent spike in violent crime says it's seized weapons and a large number of drugs in a two—day blitz. seven people were arrested as the metropolitan police violent crimes taskforce carried out dozens of stop and searches and raided several properties. detectives say the response and help they're getting from londoners over the past few weeks has been very positive. thousands of homeless people will be back on the streets of london this week as the winter shelter programme officially comes to an end. many churches say they're opening their doors to accommodate the homeless during the day so rough sleepers have somewhere safe and warm to go. the church recognises that the problem is getting worse. the number of people sleeping rough has increased dramatically. we kind of... this is a shared space in the
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church. i think if we really wanted to, we could have every pew filled with people who need to be able to sleep. let's have a look at the travel situation now. good service on all lines. the roads in north london. an investigation is taking place into an earlier accident there this morning. now for the weather forecast. good morning. afairamount now for the weather forecast. good morning. a fair amount of cloud around, at least at first this morning. the good news, it will break up. lovely spells of sunshine. feeling just a little bit more warm.
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quite breezy today. a fresh southerly breeze. more cloud in the afternoon. bright with sunny spells. the temperature, a warm 20 celsius. starting to feel a little bit more like spring and a little bit warmer. cloud will break up. clear spells through the second part of the night. a mild night. minimum temperatures, 9— 11. a bright start tomorrow morning. plenty of sunshine on wednesday. look at the temperatures. gradually climbing, 24 tomorrow. a little bit less of a breeze. 26 on thursday. barely any wind at all. a warm day. leftie of dry weather and warmer temperatures as we have right the way through the weekend. —— plenty. great temperatures. vanessa feltz will have her breakfast show on bbc radio london between 7 and 10. tune in for that if you can. hello — this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker.
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we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. we'll be hearing the remarkable story of one of the so—called windrush generation, who's onlyjust been told she's free to stay in britain, despite having lived here for 50 years. it was the london marathon moment that caught worldwide attention when matt rees helped fellow runner david wyeth to cross the finish line last year. the pair will run it again this sunday, we'll be chatting to them after 8. and we're at the woodberry wetlands nature reserve near finsbury park this morning, where we'll talk to chris packham who's launching a campaign to highlight the wildlife that's under threat. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. theresa may will seek to reassure caribbean leaders that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 up before parliament. that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 up before parliament. that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 it up before parliament. that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 it has up before parliament. that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 it has been up before parliament. it has been the that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 up before parliament. it has been the that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 convention up before parliament. it has been the that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 convention for up before parliament. it has been the that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 convention for i up before parliament. it has been the that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 convention for i up before parliament. it has been the that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 convention for i up before parliament. it has been the that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 convention for i the convention for mps to have a
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vote. that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 the convention for mps to have a vote. that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 if the convention for mps to have a vote. that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 if there the convention for mps to have a vote. that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 if there is the convention for mps to have a vote. that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 if there is a the convention for mps to have a vote. that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 if there is a vott the convention for mps to have a vote. that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 if there is a vott the convention for mps to have a vote. that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 if there is a vott vote. if there is a vote on that motion that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 vote. if there is a vote on that motion that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 today, vote. if there is a vote on that motion that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 today, it vote. if there is a vote on that motion that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 today, it will vote. if there is a vote on that motion that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 today, it will be vote. if there is a vote on that motion that the windrush generation, who came to britain between 1948 today, it will be thank you very much. police are investigating the fatal stabbing of another teenager in london. a man thought to be a team police are investigating the fatal stabbing of another teenager in london. a man, thought to be around 18, was killed in forest gate last night. so far there have been no arrests. police are investigating more than 50 murders in london so far this year. the parents of the terminally ill toddler, alfie evans, are expected to make a further legal appeal in a bid to extend his treatment. tom evans and kate james want to take alfie to rome for treatment, but doctors at alder hey children's hospital in liverpool say he's too ill. a court rejected their case yesterday but they were given 24 hours to make a further appeal — and they vowed to keep fighting. the car giant vauxhall and its sister company opel have announced plans to scale down its franchised dealerships across the uk and europe. vauxhall was taken over
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by the french psa group last year. the firms says the decision is in response to changing consumer habits. it saw an 18 percent drop in sales of new cars in the last three months. the launch of nasa's planet—hunter known as tess has been were worried about how it would work. battle. now looking bleakfor stoke city. lead through peter crouch. taking advantage of a hard fumble. they'd taken the lead through peter crouch who took advantage of a joe hart fumble in the 79th minute. crouch is now stokes all time premier league top scorer. but andy carroll scored a great volley in the 90th minute to break stoke hearts. if we keep doing what we are doing what we did before, we are going to have to win. we know exactly what will got to do. supporters are right behind us and as we said before, the tea m behind us and as we said before, the team at the start of the season, they were there for us. let's take a look at
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the bottom to table now — so a win would have moved stoke to within three points from safety, but they remain in the bottom three, with four games left to play. ten consecutive seasons stoke have enjoyed in the top flight but their hopes of survival fading fast. another week — another var controvery. this time it's caused all kinds of problems in germany last night. this is the bundesliga match between mainz and freiburg. and the players had already left the pitch for half time when the referee consulted var and awarded mainz a penalty. so he dragged all the players back out from the dressing room so that the penalty could be taken — which it was — successfully too, and mainz went on to win 2—0. our going to make the world cup final.
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preparing to make a few cups of tea. the chairman of the english footballing cities were possibly campaigning to save standing. already in already in use in scotland. the government rejected an application from the premier league side. in an open letter to club bosses, shaun harvey, the man in charge, says they are seeing significant popular demand. the parliamentary group for football will discuss safe standing. with just a couple of months to go until the world cup kicks off, there's a warning to fans over the use of secondary ticketing sites. the consumer group which? says prices are hugely inflated — with tickets for england's match against tunisia prices as huigh as £11,000. tickets bought from sites like stub hub and ticombo may also be invalid because they're not an official fifa retailer. stubhub say they don't allow
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the re—sale of world cup tickets, whist ticombo says it is not breaking the law by trading tickets. the former world number one novak djokovic is showing signs of returning to top form... he beat fellow serb dusan lajovic 6—0, 6—1 in the first round of the monte carlo masters. it was an impressive performance from the 30—year—old in his first match since splitting from his coach andre agassi. it wasn't such a good day for american jared donaldson though. the world number 51 was upset with a line call, and went full mcenroe during his match against spaniard albert ramos—vinolas. it was right here. what are you doing? call a supervisor right now. its aggressive. he went on to lose
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against the spaniard. we've had plenty of april showers this month haven't we, and it's not been good for cricket's county championship. all the opening round matches were all affected by the weather to some degree. but nowhere more so than in leeds where the match between yorkshire and essex was abandoned without a ball being bowled across all four days. that's the first time since 1967 that it's happened at headingley in the county championship. you can't get up and the umpire's face like that. it's quite scary. he just went right into his face. the umpire said, what are you doing? just back off. but it gets like that. he said he lost the match.
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just that inhabit. it can work either way, can't it? this lunchtime's emergency debate on syria will allow mps to again debate parliament's role in approving military action. it's been secured by jeremy corbyn, who says theresa may should have consulted mps before she authorised air strikes. the prime minister says the action was both "legally and morally right". let's talk to labour's paul sweeney who's at westminster. bank are talking to us this morning. we are reporting in the news that —— thank you to talking to us this morning. weapons inspectors are exactly what happened in regard to the chemical attack. are you concerned about the fact it has been delayed until tomorrow? concerned about the fact it has been delayed untiltomorrow? it has concerned about the fact it has been delayed until tomorrow? it has been concerning the timescales have been delayed given it has been over ten days since the attacks took place but it's also critical parliament should have had a say on this issue before british forces were committed to any military action, that is what
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labour's concern is at. given how many great powers are involved in the theatre in syria, whether it is turkey, russia, israel, it is critical we didn't escalate this issue beyond what was absolutely necessary , issue beyond what was absolutely necessary, which is white critical parliament should have debated this. the doors aren't open, so doesn't it give theresa may's argument that she had to act quickly wait?” give theresa may's argument that she had to act quickly wait? i don't think so. what have to work through diplomatic channels first of all to make sure we've exhausted all the methods of doing so before we risk military action. that's why there's been a breakthrough in that and i hope to see that precede and hopefully the opcw will issue the results of its investigation before too long we and can establish the fa cts o n too long we and can establish the facts on the ground, where there has
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been an atrocity with the use of chemical weapons. you agree with your leaderjeremy corbyn we should only see military action if it is agreed by the un security council? we should also do always pursued diplomatic channels in the first instance. given that argument, how would with russia's veto of the security council, how would they ever allow the likes of the us, uk and france to take military action in syria if they can veto that? there was an agreement in 2013 to investigate the incident of chemical weapons use back then. and last year as well. there is an total intractability at the un. we have to test and exhaust that option before we resort to military action which is what we were suggesting should have taken place in the first insta nce have taken place in the first instance yesterday which is very reasonable. we saw a very long debate in the commons yesterday,
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pretty heated comments. yes, i was 140th mp to ask the prime minister a question. out of 140. i was the last. i'm glad you stayed around for the rest of it. one of your labour mp colleagues suggested that labour's edition of intervening was challenged by the stance jeremy corbyn was taken. what do you say to kalex like that? i don't agree. i'm thinking of robin cook, and labour is holding that role where the role of parliament is to scrutinise any action by britain overseas in respect of military action, particularly when there is a significant risk of escalating a major conflict worse than it is. can i ask you one further question? this is hypothetical but i'd say there was another chemical attack next month. how long, judging by what
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you're saying, and you're agreeing with jeremy corbyn's way you're saying, and you're agreeing withjeremy corbyn's way of progressing, how long would you take to ta ke progressing, how long would you take to take action on that if you haven't had...? to take action on that if you haven't had. . . ? what i'd like to see is parliament debate this substantively today and set out the scope of how britain should proceed in syria. we should be pursuing a coherent policy in regards to syria, not reacting in the way we have. we should that... it is disappointing the parliament are relying on opposition parties to put forward the opposition debate. theresa may was able to bring in a motion on the debate, but she hasn't done that, so the tories are running scared of parliamentary scrutiny and you have to ask why that is. thank you for talking to us. paul sweeney from the labour party, 140th mp to ask
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theresa may a question out of 140. i think there is sunshine on the way... good morning, there certainly is. i'm at woodbury wet lands. it has only been open two years, opened by sir david attenborough himself. it is chilly this morning because of the breeze. the temperatures are about 10.5, also worth mentioning if you have an allergy to tree pollen, the levels are high across eastern and south england and moderate in wales, northern ireland and scotland. this morning as well as some sunshine, we have some rain coming in overnight across northern ireland where it has been quite heavy and it is pushing is so it is across scotland, parts of the
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north—east are currently dry. by nine o'clock it would be out of northern ireland and you'll be seeing some showers. it'll go over parts of england and wales. ahead of it, cloud building with brighter skies today across the east of east anglia and the far south—east of england where we will hang on the sunshine. if we take a look at that, you can see how the rain progresses eastwards. it doesn't make huge progress a cross eastwards. it doesn't make huge progress across parts of england, and you'll also find it will tend to wea ken and you'll also find it will tend to weaken as it does so. the sunshine is turning hazy and behind it it will be bright with sunny spells. across scotland are northern ireland, there will be some showers, some of which will be heavy and potentially thundery. temperatures today 14—17 but in the south—east, we could hit 20 which is higher than yesterday. through the evening and overnight, that weather front which is continuing to weaken drift across england and wales. not much not on
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it than a band of showers. it won't be very cold overnight. we not expecting any issues at all with frost. tomorrow morning starts on that cloudy note, may be showers across north wales and north—west of england. that is a week weather front turning north. as it pushes across northern ireland and north—west scotland in particular, we will see heavier rain but it will continue to journey northwards and clear. then for most of us tomorrow we will see some decent sunny spells, particularly the further south you are because you will have them earlier on in the day. and temperatures tomorrow in the south up temperatures tomorrow in the south up to 24. in the north, 14—17 again. it is after that things start to warm up it is after that things start to warm up across it is after that things start to warm up across the whole of the uk. somewhere in the south on thursday could hit 26. we are hanging onto some fun weather into the weekend although not quite as warm. one thing iforgot to mention is it is going to be very windy, especially
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in the west. you just remembered that last—minute. all is forgiven. thank you very much. a good day for a yellow coat as well. i've got coke envy. as soon as you saw it this morning. there's news of a ground—breaking discovery in the quest to help food and drinks companies deal with a stick raised. ben is in did cut finding out more and a vast warehouse. good morning, welcomed oxfordshire. if you call it a warehouse, they won't be happy. they've come up with an amazing way of dealing with all the plastic waste we're regulating. we're not recycling enough of it. it is an enzyme that will break down the plastic. it will help break it
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down to its component parts which means it will be reused. it is a real problem, though because in the uk we use nearly 14 million plastic bottles every single year which is a growing problem and we've seen those pictures of plastic in the oceans cluttering up our environment but 60% of them can be recycled so there needs to be more done to make sure they are reused. they need to be reused for practical purposes. if you recycle a bottle it can be made into carpet or synthetic fibres. so what we have seen from the big companies including coca—cola and nestle, they say they will file to recycle more of the west and get it reused rather than it going to landfill. and, so what they've done here is come up with pretty novel research which will help them break down the plastics into the component parts and reuse them again so let us talk to the guys behind this project. we've come up with pretty
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novel research and it allows you to use an enzyme which will break the plastic into component parts. about two years ago a japanese group researching in a pet plant found a bacteria that lives on plastic which is amazing because plastic has only been around for 50 years so it is amazing it has evolved to use that. we are amazing it has evolved to use that. we a re interested amazing it has evolved to use that. we are interested in the enzyme. it has biological enzymes which eat it. this is an enzyme which eats pet. it turnsit this is an enzyme which eats pet. it turns it back into the lego blocks that we can then reused to make plastic properly so it is a way of properly recycling plastic as opposed to putting it in landfill or incinerating it, this is a much better solution. good luck with it. we will talk more later and you can explain more. i want to introduce the guys behind the facility. we heard how it works but how... why do need something like this? this is vast, what can you do here with
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that? the work that john has described relies fundamentally on being able to know where every single atom is in those enzymes and then be able to understand how to develop that to target different types of problems. the x—rays that we used to determine the structure produced here are incredibly bright and the brighter the x—ray the greater the details with which you can study materials. serve the size of the instruments, the greater the degree of information we get from the materials. it applies to the enzymes and everything that changes our lives whether it is better batteries for the cars you might drive in the future or advanced materials for electronic devices. we attract about 5000 scientists from industry and university every year to use this machine because it is fundamental to
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their research. fascinating stuff. we will talk more later but thanks for explaining how that works. that gives you a little taste of what they're doing down here. very interesting work they've got going on. we will show you around later but, as you'll appreciate, a lot of it, given we are talking about high—speed x—rays, is in these big yellow boxes so i can't show you those but nonetheless you will have to ta ke those but nonetheless you will have to take my word for it that pretty amazing stuff is going on in oxfordshire. ina oxfordshire. in a research facility, not a warehouse. i won't make that mistake again. more on that later. after nine days and just over 26 miles, claire has finally finished the greater manchester marathon. we spoke to her last week. she's paralysed from the chest down following a riding accident seven years ago and took on the race in her very own bionic suit. we watched her over the final
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few miles. nine days after the manchester marathon began, the bionic woman, claire lomas, crosses the finish line. amazing, very humbling. what message does she sent out? that it isn't impossible and there is hope no matter what your abilities. good on her! five hours earlier, we met for super strength coffee to kick—start the final stretch of her amazing journey. how do you feel? nervous. very nervous. everyone thinks it is tough. it is but it is nothing like getting out of bed when you have nothing to get up for. nothing like getting out of bed when you have nothing to get up fonm 2007, she was a champion equestrian but a freak accident left her paralysed from the chest down. descent into depression would have been easy. instead she is powered on raising money and awareness to find a cure for paralysis in it was devastating but i also felt
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genuinely lucky because i can pick up my genuinely lucky because i can pick up my children. people with neck injuries can feed themselves and dressed themselves again, all of those things that people take for granted. we are getting closer but it doesn't happen without the funding. one last push. come on! you, as a mum, to see the progress she has made, flipping heck!m you, as a mum, to see the progress she has made, flipping heck! it is amazing. i don't think she would change her life back if she could. she says that. you have raised a good one. you have. all of these ca rs good one. you have. all of these cars beeping for your mum! are you
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very proud? yes. it isjust amazing people are stopping and donating. and hooting. when you get tired and struggling and when that happens it gives you a boost to keep going. tea m gives you a boost to keep going. team claire finally make it to the finish line record time. what she does to raise awareness and for spinal injuries isjust amazing. you smashed your record, absolutely smashed your record, absolutely smashed it. it is amazing. iam smashed your record, absolutely smashed it. it is amazing. i am the only person to finish a marathon factor because everyone keeps bringing us food out on the route! absolutely brilliant. she is amazing, isn't she? a lovely lady. still to come this morning, we will bejoined by lady. still to come this morning, we will be joined by jack lady. still to come this morning, we will bejoined byjack laugher lady. still to come this morning, we will be joined byjack laugher who completed a clean sweep of commonwealth gold box team england in the diving, despite only training
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for a fortnight because of injury. even more impressive. before that we will get news and travel and weather where ever you are watching and we will see you with the national headlines, see you in a few minutes' time. good morning, iam matterare time. good morning, iam matter are met. once again this morning there is news of a teenager being stabbed to death. this time in east london. the victim is believed to be 18 and was found injured in chester avenue in forest gate just before midnight. there has been one violent death in london every other day since the start of the year. no arrests in this latest killing have been made but a new group set up by police earlier this month to tackle the recent spike in violent crime says it seized weapons and a large number of drugs in a two—day blitz. seven people were arrested as the violent crimes task force carried out dozens of stop and searches and raided
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several properties. detectives say the response and help they are getting from london is in the past few weeks has been positive. thousands of homeless people will be back on the streets of london this week ‘s. many churches say they are opening their doors to accommodate the homeless during the day so rough sleepers have somewhere safe and warm to go. the church recognises that the problem is getting worse. the number of people sleeping rough in london has increased dramatically. it is a shared space in the church so if we really wanted to we could have every pew filled with people who need to be able to sleep. let us take a look at the troubled situation this morning. the tube has a good service reported on all surfaces so far. the weather forecast now. good
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morning. there is a fair amount of cloud around, at least at first this morning but the good news is it will start to break up and we have lovely spells of sunshine and it is going to feel warmer. it is breezy today and a fresh southerly breeze and more cloud moving in as we head through the afternoon. it is fairly high so it will be bright and sunny and the temperature gets up to 20 celsius so it is starting to feel a bit more like spring and a bit warmer. overnight cloud but gradually it will break up and we will get clearer spells as we head through the second part of the night. a bright start tomorrow morning with plenty of sunshine around as we head through wednesday and look at the temperatures. gradually climbing. 24 tomorrow and
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less of a breeze. 26 as we had three thursday with barely any wind at all and a very warm day. getting cooler but plenty of dry and warm temperatures as we head through the weekend. va nessa weekend. vanessa feltz has a breakfast show on bbc radio london in a few moments time and on the programme is a story about people living in newly built flats in greenwich who say they have lost value on their properties as concerns about the cladding on their building go unresolved and they are now taking legal action to sort it out. goodbye. hello — this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. the prime minister is to face questions from caribbean leaders over the uk's treatment of thousands of commonwealth migrants. the meeting comes after the home secretary was forced to apologise to members of the so called windrush generation, describing the government's behaviour as appalling. good morning — it's tuesday 17 april.
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also this morning: inside the site of the suspected chemical weapons attack in syria. we hear first hand accounts from the town of douma as russia says that international weapons inspectors will be allowed to travel there tomorrow. almost 25 years since the death of stephen lawrence, his mother doreen tells breakfast that violent crime against young black men is still not being taken seriously enough. a breakthrough in the battle against plastic waste. researchers have come up plastic waste. researchers have come up with a new enzyme that will eat plastic. how does it work and what is this machine had to do with it in oxford? a hammer blow for stoke as andy carrol‘s dramatic late equaliser clinches it for west ham to deny them a precious win in their battle for
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premier league survival. and carol has the weather. good morning from woodberry wetlands in north—east london. the lovely start today, albeit a bit chilly. rain coming in from the west, easing off as we go through the day, sunshine and showers and temperatures today, up to 20 but from today onwards, is going to turn that bit warmer. first, our main story. theresa may will seek to reassure caribbean leaders that the windrush generation — who came to britain between 1948 and 1971 — won't be deported due to paperwork issues. the government has apologised amid growing anger over revelations that thousands of people were being incorrectly identified as illegal immigrants. the prime minister is to meet other commonwealth leaders in london, as jon donnison reports. the so—called windrush generation. commonwealth migrants who came to britain as children decades ago but, due to a tightening
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of immigration laws, now say they're being treated like foreigners in their own home. people like sonia williams, who came here from barbados in the 1970s when she wasjust 13. i can't drive, i can't work, i can't claim benefits, i can't do anything. when they took away my driving licence in 2016, i started to put it together and i thought, no, this is all connected, and they're saying i'm an illegal immigrant. as commonwealth leaders gather in london for a summit, the prime minister has reversed a decision not to discuss the issue with them. but only after her home secretary was forced to apologise. i do not want any of the commonwealth citizens who are here legally to be impacted in the way they have, and frankly, some of the way they have been treated has been wrong, has been appalling, and i am sorry.
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voiceover: citizens of the british empire coming to the mother country with good intent. 70 years after the first of the windrush generation arrived, the government has now promised to resolve all disputed cases within two weeks. john donnison, bbc news. let's get the latest on syria now, and russia says inspectors from the chemical weapons watchdog will be allowed to visit the site of a suspected gas attack in douma tomorrow. the team has been waiting in damascus since saturday. when they arrive in douma they are expected to gather samples to help identify which substances — if any — were used in the attack. the us has expressed concern that russia might have tampered with the site. both russia and syria deny that any chemical weapons were used. seth doane from cbs news is one of the first western journalists to visit douma since the weekend. he was taken there by syrian government forces. from there, he has sent this report.
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this was rebel territory until two days ago. and today, we made it to the very house where the suspected chemical attack took place. "all of a sudden, some gas spread around us," this neighbour recounted. "we couldn't breathe, it smelt like chlorine." syrian forces recaptured this area from rebels over the weekend. how did the chemicals get here? "the missile up there," he pointed on the roof. we asked him to take us to where the missile allegedly hit. he took took us here and pointed here. where we found a missile neatly resting. the human toll of the fighting was evident in the main square this afternoon. hundreds of thousands of civilians have been living here, many without food for months. you can see the desperation here, people just hoping for some bread. we asked this mother of five why she didn't leave,
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if the fighting had been so bad. "we tried more than once," she told us, "but the rebels wouldn't let us go." nine days have already passed since the suspected chemical attack, and if weapons experts do make it to that building, they would find a scene that has been tampered with, and eyewitness accounts that can be confusing and contradictory. seth doane, cbs news for bbc news, damascus. our middle eastern correspondent martin patiencejoins us from beirut. martin, what more can you tell us about the investigation by the chemical weapons watcdog? —— watchdog? we think they are going to get in on wednesday. what is extraordinary is that it was russia and the syrian government who want this team to come in the first place, they were pressing for this ahead of the
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western airstrikes. the western airstrikes happened on saturday. they had been sitting there for four days. it's not clear, russia suggesting yesterday the paperwork wasn't in order but we're never going to back down. alfie, we are stronger than ever and we will keep fighting all the way. thank you. police are investigating the fatal stabbing of another teenager in london, a man thought to be around 18 was killed in forest gate last night. so far there have been no arrests than police are investigating more than 50 murders in london so far this year. the car giant vauxhall and its sister company opel have announced
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plans to scale down their franchise dealerships across the uk and europe. vauxhall was taken over last year and the firm says the decision is in response to changes in consumer habits. an 18% drop in sales of new cars. the norge of nasa's pana hunter tess has been suspended until at least tomorrow. it was supposed to go off yesterday but was called off three hours before liftoff. if you're one of those fortunate people who have had your road resurfaced, you might be interested to see this because they were services had to skirt around a parked car. the road was com pletely around a parked car. the road was completely resurfaced apart from this little section directly underneath this beauty. a resident sedge returned from work to see the gap outside her house. she thinks the car close to a neighbour. the
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council says the residents were warned well in advance of the resurfacing works. let's ta ke resurfacing works. let's take you back to one of our main stories. despite living and working in the uk for decades many of these so—called windrush generation who came from the caribbean have been told they are here illegally because of a lack of paperwork. the home secretary yesterday apologised for their appalling treatment and announced a task force to put things right. but for some mps it was too little, too late. despite slavery, despite colonisation, 25,000 caribbeans served in the first world war and second world war alongside british troops. when my parents and their generation arrived in this country under the nationality act of 1948, they arrived here as british citizens. it is inhumane and cruel force a ny citizens. it is inhumane and cruel force any of that windrush generation to have suffered so long
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in this condition and for the secretary of skate only to have made a statement today. that was in the house of commons yesterday. let's speak to trevor stirling, a solicitor whose parents came from jamaica in 1959. good morning and thank you forjoining us. so much strength of feeling about this. talk to us about your parents story and your story as well, how has it impacted on you. we heard from david lambie and my story is summer. my pa rents lambie and my story is summer. my parents came here in the 1950s part of the windrush generation, they came here to help and support this nation, taking on work in the 1960s and bringing up a family. i was born in the late 1960s, have always felt british, my parents always felt that dish, and my parents went through the nationalisation process in the 70s so they feel this is yet another indication that their britishness is
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not as british as it should be. and they always have to qualify themselves in one shape or form. it is fortunate for my parents they have the relevant paperwork. they we re have the relevant paperwork. they were not part of the group caught up in this but they share the same emotion. does the apology make any difference to them? apologies come easy, in many ways and what we need to see is clear action. this has been going on for a long time and it is fortunate we have had the media focus on it. there were many tragic stories, people who have lost their jobs, not received appropriate health care treatment, they've had problems finding places to live or problems finding places to live or problems with their pension. what we now need is a process which is implemented straightaway, where people can receive the relevant reassurance and that they have the releva nt reassurance and that they have the relevant right to stay here without being questioned. at this point it doesn't seem clear whether anybody knows whether people have been
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deported. have you heard cases of that? only anecdotally. it is unclear and the home office should have the information. they should have the information. they should have known who was entitled to be here in the first place but it is all anecdotal so there is no fracked trial evidence. what we do know is factually is that people's lives have been turned upside down. absolutely. we will here and talk to somebody about that later. we have heard they will try to deal with cases sensitively. what about that? what about other issues as well? do you think the government should look at compensation for people? compensation is a difficult issue. this policy is referred to as the hostile immigration environment and it has been hostile and it doesn't need to be hostile. the reality is this people not entitled to be here should still treated with a certain amount of respect and dignity. the fa ct
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amount of respect and dignity. the fact the windrush generation aren't titled to be here, it should be a fairly simple process which facilitates them receiving the paperwork. the festivity has to stop. the hostility was extended to the head of the commonwealth countries who requested a meeting with the prime minister and even that was rebutted initially. so there needs to be a much greater understanding that people are people and need to be treated with respect whether they are immigrants or not. and did it come as a total surprise to many of these people, your pa rents to many of these people, your parents included, that it wasn't the case they had the right documents? this struck at the heart of the windrush generation because it wasn't something which impacted necessary on adults. it has impacted on the children that came here because that was the exception in 1962. the door was closed in 1973, essentially. we are talking about the windrush generation that were
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children and they will have travelled here on their parents passports. they will have felt particularly dish because they will have had much of their life in this country. that has been the biggest shock for the community. these were people that felt very british. my pa rents felt people that felt very british. my parents felt british but they came here when they were 18—19. they've spent 50 odd years here and have been treated in this way. but to talk to you, trevor stirling. thank you for your time and we will speak to david liddington later as well. tuesday morning, this is breakfast from bbc news, let'sjust tuesday morning, this is breakfast from bbc news, let's just show you the front pages. we're talking about windrush and the guardian have been investigating this right from the start and they have got pictures of various people who have been directly affected, and that apology from amber rudd yesterday. most of the papers are dominated by pictures of and to mcpartlin and his
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£86,000 fine. this was part of a quote he gave yesterday. this is the front page of the daily mail. they are also talking about the windrush outrage, as they've written it. front page of the mirror, ant mcpartlin. we will hear his words in a moment. i will show some other papers. the daily telegraph has ant mcpartlin on the front page and windrush immigrants getting an apology. and the times as well, they have a story about russians hacking into millions of computers. the global hacking offensive has targeted millions of computers to spy on governments and lay the foundation of an attack on infrastructure. the reason ant mcpartlin makes the front pages is because he was in court yesterday and this is what he had to say outside of court. i want to say i am
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truly sorry for what happened. higher standards are expected of me, i expect some of myself. i let myself down and a lot of people down, for that i'm truly sorry. i'd like to apologise to everybody involved in the crash and i'm just thankful nobody was seriously hurt. thank you very much. that was ant mcpartlin speaking outside of court after he was handed that £86,000 fine. it seems regularly there is some sort of research about drinking tea or coffee does to you. whether it is good or bad. this is the latest. drinking coffee could keep your heartbeat going it says. i've never had a cup of coffee. you a lwa ys never had a cup of coffee. you always have one at 6am, super strong. i've never had a cup of coffee in my life because i don't like the smell. drinking up to four cups of coffee a day is likely to curb abnormal heart rhythms. in some studies, caffeine, abundant in coffee, tea, chocolate, has been linked to changes in the pacemaker
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cells in the heart's a trim said patients with an irregular heartbeat are advised to avoid it but a modest caffeine intake is mildly protective, according to a brand—new review by cardiologists in australia. what is a modest intake? one coffee and three ts? i'm basing this on my sister who has about 19,000 cups of tea a day. good news for coffee drinkers today. carol has good news on the weather. good morning. i'm in a nature reserve. we have seen good morning. i'm in a nature reserve. we have seen the most stunning sunrise this morning. it is still chilly, but the sun will come out today. and then temperatures up to 20. it isn't going to be warm everywhere because what we have is a weather front coming in from the west and that is currently producing some rain as it moves eastwards and will continue to weaken as we go
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through the day. we take a look at the map. there will be some showers left behind but the rain will cross scotland, northern england, wales and south—west england. some of the rain will be happy as it moves across scotland. out of northern ireland, you have some showers. the rain in the north—west of england and wales as well. the cloud build so and wales as well. the cloud build so the sunshine terms hazy. the far south east will hang on to the sunshine the longest, particularly the east of the south east of east anglia and kent. this is where we are expecting temperatures in london to be around 20. if you are in the rain, it'll feel colder than that and through the day as the front pushes east, it'll be can. foremost it'll end up being a band of cloud and possibly the odd shower. behind it some heavy showers but also some
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bright spells and sunshine. it'll be windy. more especially in the west. we will have gales to the irish sea, gusting 40—50 miles an hour. this evening and overnight, that weather front will not be much more than a band of cloud. it'll pivot and retreat northwards once again. after all of this, despite the fact there will be some cloud skies it'll be a cold night which leads us into tomorrow. again we start off with showers across the north—west england, wales, and as they push northwards, they develop into more heavy rain across northern ireland and western scotland but they will continue to push northwards eventually, allowing brighter skies to follow on. then temperatures start to rise with highs roughly between 17—24. 24 in the south—east. on thursday, parts of the south—east could hit 26. and all of us hang
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onto this warmer weather as we head into the weekend but as we have a change in the high—pressure, a slight change in the wind direction means it won't be as warm as we are expecting tomorrow and thursday. it does look like a lovely morning. thank you. this sunday will mark the 25th anniversary of the murder of stephen lawrence, a crime which continues to have ramifications for our society. the organisation which came infor our society. the organisation which came in for most criticism over the yea rs came in for most criticism over the years is the metropolitan police. in an exclusive interview with this programme stephen's mother says violent crime against young men is still not been taken serious li na. such an amazing space, isn't it? stephen lawrence dreamt of becoming an architect. as you walk in, you think, wow. i'm eating his mother, doreen, at the newly refurbished home of the charity that bears his name. “—
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home of the charity that bears his name. —— i'm meeting his mother. home of the charity that bears his name. -- i'm meeting his mother. he started really young, he had a eft, he did a lot of drawings. the stephen lawrence charitable trust seeks to transform the lives of young people and help fulfil their ambitions. sometimes i think why should i bother because i will never get into thosejobs. should i bother because i will never get into those jobs. but they can and we want to make sure they realise that. sunday will mark the 25th anniversary of stephen's murder. he died following a racially motivated attack by a gang of youths. his death was horrendous and it marks a time when a lot of things was happening to a lot of black men at the time. as we move forward, i wa nted at the time. as we move forward, i wanted to see how his name could change things and i think i managed to do that. stephen's death led to a changing the law. in 2012, dobson and david norris were found guilty of is murder. dobson had previously been acquitted following a private
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prosecution brought by the family. as things stood, you couldn't be retried for the same offence. double jeopardy law was changed. so somebody who has been tried and found not guilty, as soon as you have compelling new evidence you can bring the individual to the court again. a public inquiry in 1999 heavily criticise the metropolitan police's handling of stephen's murder. he mistakes had been made. it's damning conclusion? the met was institutionally racist. violent crime is clearly an issue in london. do you think the police take a crime less seriously if the victim is back? i would say yes. when stephen was killed, his murder wasn't investigated in the way it should have been done. how a lot of these cases have been investigated now, it is investigated into a different unit. it isn't the same for young black men when they've been murdered, they don't take it
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seriously enough. so if the victim is white, the crime is taken more cerci? definitely. they will tell you it isn't true but the evidence speaks for itself. in the statement, the metropolitan police said that there had been... on sunday, a team of architects will run the london marathon in honour of stephen. it'll be a very difficult day for me anyway. i want to be there to support them and to say... just to say thank you. do you ever think about the kind of man he would be now? i think about that because he could be married, he could have a family, he could be into his profession so those are the positive things i would like to hold that thatis things i would like to hold that that is where he would have been. that was doreen lawrence speaking to
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tim muffett. there is a programme about stephen lawrence and the impact on society on bbc one tonight at 9pm. it goes over three days. we showed you the papers a few men to go and one of the store is also making the front pages is about a major breakthrough in tackling the waste of plastic. it is all about an enzyme found by accident. ben can tell us all about it. good morning. welcome to didcot in oxfordshire. this science facility is vast. it is the size of wembley stadium. it goes for miles. a huge circular building. you might wonder how a building like this has anything to do with plastic. they have come up with a new enzyme that paul blake —— break plastics into their two component parts. it means
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they can then be reused and made into bottles again. traditional recycling at the moment doesn't let you do that because the bottle would be cloudy. by breaking them down it means they can be reused. what this facility does, these boxes contain x—rays that are spinning around at the speed of light. around 300,000 kilometres per hour. that means they can look of those molecules in more detail than ever before and make an enzyme that acts much more quickly. the problem is even though the enzyme can break down this bottle it ta kes a enzyme can break down this bottle it takes a long time to do. what they are doing is coming up with a way to make the enzyme work faster. it could be one of the answers in our battle against plastic. the tide of plastic waste clogging up our oceans. a number of companies have signed up to it. they are trying to recycle more of these things. we will meet the team that has
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discovered it and the facility honours, and talk you through how the process works later. before that, your local news. good morning. once again this morning there is news of a teenager being stabbed to death, this time in east london. the victim, believed to be 18 was found injured in forest gate just before midnight. be 18 was found injured in forest gatejust before midnight. there has been more than one violent death in london every other day since the start of the year. no arrests have been made. a new group said up by police earlier this month to tackle the recent spike in violent crime says it has seized weapons and a large number of drugs ina weapons and a large number of drugs in a blitz. seven people were arrested as the metropolitan police violent crimes task force carried out dozens of stop and searches and raided several properties.
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detectives say the response and help they are getting from london is in recent weeks has been very positive. thousands of homeless people will be back on the streets of london this week, as the winter shelter programme officially comes to an end. many churches say they are opening their doors to accommodate the homeless during the day. the church recognises that the problem here is getting worse. the number of people sleeping rough in london has increased dramatically. this is a shared space in the church. i think if we really wa nted in the church. i think if we really wanted to, we could have every pew filled with people who need to be able to sleep. let's look at the travel situation. a good service on the tube. on the roads, peckham high street is closed between peckham hill street and bell on the road. now let's get the weather. good
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morning. afairamount now let's get the weather. good morning. a fair amount of cloud first thing this morning. it will start to break up and we will see some lovely spells of sunshine. it will start to feel a bit warmer. quite breezy today. a fresh breeze. more cloud moving in in the afternoon. it will still be bright. sunny spells. temperature up to 20 celsius. starting to feel a bit more like spring. overnight, still some cloud, but gradually that will break up. shura spells in the second part of the night. a mild night as well. a bright start tomorrow morning. plenty of sunshine. just look at the temperatures. 24 as we had three
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tomorrow. less of a breeze. 26 as we head through thursday. a very warm day. getting cooler but still plenty of dry weather and warm temperatures as we had right the way through the weekend. on our website, weekend. on ourwebsite, in weekend. on our website, in light of the rise in knife crime, there is a video featuring for people who have been stopped. they share their experience of actually being stabbed, explaining what it felt like. worth taking a look. bye for now. good morning, watching breakfast. a summary good morning, watching breakfast. a summary of the main stories. theresa may will seek to reassure caribbean leaders that the wind restoration who came to britain between 1948 won't be deported due to paperwork issues. thousands of people are
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being incorrectly identified as illegal immigrants. the prime minister is to meet other commonwealth leaders in london. mps will continue debate their role in justifying air strikes on syria without consulting parliament. jeremy corbyn secured the emergency debate after accusing the prime minister bypassing the commons in order to follow president trump. here is alex forsyth. the uk's involvement in air strikes in syria has divided opinion. notjust drawing protests, but debate too. yesterday mps spend more than six hours discussing the military action. the prime minister was there throughout, answering more than 140 questions, defending her decision. let me be absolutely clear. we have acted because it is in our national interest. it is in our national interest. it is in our national interest to prevent the further use
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of chemical weapons in syria and to uphold and defend the global consensus that these weapons should not be used. but the labour leader said the strikes were legally questionable and could be counter—productive, arguing the focus should be on a political solution. this house was not only denied a vote, but did not have the opportunity to question the government in advance on the legal and evidential basis for their participation in this action. despite the lengthy and late session, the debate was heated, with disagreement over whether mps should have had a say before the strikes we re have had a say before the strikes were ordered. as someone who supported military action against daesh in syria in 2015, may i say gently daesh in syria in 2015, may i say ge ntly to daesh in syria in 2015, may i say gently to the prime minister that she should have come first to the house before committing our forces to action. the public will understand that when our forces needed to act quickly and
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decisively, and safely, in concert with our allies, it must be right to authorise strikes without giving notice. when the talking stopped at 11pm, there was no binding vote. but plenty of strong feeling. and today the debate over these crucial principles will continue. police are investigating the fatal stabbing of another teenager in london. the man, thought to be 18, was killed in forest gate last night. so far there have been no arrests. police are investigating more than 50 murders in london so far this year. the parents of a terminally ill toddler, alfie evans, are expected to make a further legal appeal ina are expected to make a further legal appeal in a bid to extend his treatment. thom evans and kate james wa nt to ta ke treatment. thom evans and kate james want to take alfie to rome for treatment. but doctors at alder hey —— alder hey hospital in liverpool so —— alder hey hospital in liverpool so he is too ill. a court rejected their case yesterday. they were given 24 hours to make a further
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appeal and vowed to keep on fighting. up to a third of people born in the 1980s and 90s may never on the run home, according to a new report. research by the resolution foundation, a think tank, says one third of the millennium generation could be renting when they retire. the government says it is already putting policies in place to attempt to improve the housing market. an update on something from yesterday, the launch of nasa's planet hunter has been postponed until tomorrow. the telescope was due to leave from cape canaveral in florida last night. it was called off three hours before liftoff. you have been looking at that. something to do with the saponara? yeah, i believe they call of the navigational system. that's more sophisticated. and some sort of leader but not a
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serious one. but they are ok. that is your nasa update. and glad it is notjust me who has problems with the sad now. going in the wrong direction as well, stoke. so disappointing for them last night. they came so close to victory against west ham. it would've been a crucial win. they needed that three points as they gather around the bottom of the table. they are running out of games. they are confident of getting three more victories. it is looking unlikely at this point. is pretty bleak. denied their first this point. is pretty bleak. denied theirfirst win in this point. is pretty bleak. denied their first win in ten games this point. is pretty bleak. denied theirfirst win in ten games by this point. is pretty bleak. denied their first win in ten games by a late equaliser at west ham. they had taken the lead through peter crouch. he took advantage of a fumble byjoe hart. crouch is now stoke's all—time premier league scorer. andy carroll broke premier league scorer. andy carroll bro ke sto ke premier league scorer. andy carroll broke stoke writes with an equaliser in the 90th minute. if we keep doing what we are
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doing... we are going to have to win. we know what we have to do. the supporters are right behind us. if the team had been playing like that at the start of the season, we would not be in the position we were in. let's look at the bottom of the table. a win would have moved stoke to within three points of safety. they remain in —— remain in the bottom three. their hopes of survival are fading fast. another week, another va controversy. it has caused all kinds of problems in germany last night. this is the bundesliga match between mines and freiberg. the players had already left the pitch at half time when the referee consulted var. he awarded mines a penalty. he dragged the players back out of the dressing rooms of the penalty could be taken.
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it was successfully. the chairman of the english football league says he is robustly campaigning for safe standing within stadiums. it is already in use in scotland, celtic park. last week the government rejected an application from west brom to try safe standing out of the hawthorns. shaun harvey, the man in charge of the efl, says there is significant popular demand for standing to be allowed. the all party parliamentary group on iran will discuss it on the 1st of may. —— on standing. with a couple of months until the world cup, there is a warning to fans over the use of secondary ticket size. consumer group which? says prices are hugely inflated, with tickets for the england match against tunisia priced as high as £11,000. the tickets may also be invalid because they are not
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official fifa retailers. former world number one novak djokovic is showing signs of returning to top form. he beat fellow serb in the first round of the monte carlo masters. it was a pretty impressive performance from the 30—year—old in his first match since splitting from his coach, andre agassi. it was not such a good idea for a american jared andre agassi. it was not such a good idea for a americanjared donaldson. the world number 51 was upset with a line call. he went full onjohn mcenroe. after this performance, being quite aggressive to the umpire, went on to lose and sarcastically apologised to his opponent but would not shake the umpire's hand. it has gone too far there, hasn't it? it has. it is not sporting. a p pa re ntly it has. it is not sporting. apparently did apologise but a p pa re ntly apparently did apologise but apparently it was rather sarcastic. after nine days
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and just over 26 miles, claire lomas has finally completed the greater manchester marathon, to cheering crowds at the finish line. you might remember we spoke to claire while she was on the route last week. she's paralysed from the chest down, following a riding accident seven years ago, and took on the race in her own special bionic suit. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin watched her over the finalfew miles. the days after the manchester marathon began, claire, the bionic woman, crosses the finish line. amazing. very humbling. what message do you think she sends out? that it is not impossible and there is hope, no matter what your abilities. good on her. five hours earlier, we met for super strength coffee to kick—start the final strengths bulimic or stretch. how do you feel? very nervous today. -- the final
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stretch. very tough. but nothing compared to getting at of bed when i had nothing to get up for in the early days. in 2007, the champion equestrian. freak accident left her paralysed. descent into depression would have been easy. she has powered instead, raising money and awareness to find a cure for paralysis, as well as falling in love, getting married, having two children. i was devastated, but i felt lucky because i have use of my arms. ican felt lucky because i have use of my arms. i can pick up my children. a cu re arms. i can pick up my children. a cure would mean people would get independence back. we are edging closer. it does not happen without the funding. let us hit the road. one last push. come on. well done
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excellent not many miles! you, to see the progress she has made, as her mum. amazing. i do not think she would change her life back, if she could. she says that. you have raised a good one. all of these cars beeping for your mum. are you very proud? yeah. amazing. when you get tired and struggling, it gives you the boost to keep going. team claire finally make it to the finish line in record time. raising awareness and funds. no injuries, amazing. you did hold it together. he smashed your record, absolutely smashed it! shaved off loads of days, i am the
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only person to finish a marathon fatter because people keep greenness food on the route! —— keep bringing us. having a well-deserved rest! what are you looking at? carol getting ready for the weather! such a determined lady, thank you for talking to us. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... the prime minister will meet leaders of caribbean countries today, to discuss the threatened deportation of people who came to the uk as child migrants between the 1940s and ‘70s. an emergency debate will take place in the commons, to allow mps to consider parliament's role in approving military action against syria. i was looking at carol getting ready for the weather, unlike the flurry of activity before we go live,
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hello. just as well you did not say what we were doing! i am at woodbury wetla nds what we were doing! i am at woodbury wetlands nature reserve in north london, gorgeous. the most spectacular sunrise this morning and this was only open to macri is ago by sir david attenborough. it is free. —— only opened two years ago. the sun is starting to come out here in london and we will have it for much of the day but it is not the case everywhere. today we have a band of rain coming in from the west and it will be moving east through the day, some heavy, eventually this afternoon especially, it will weaken into not much more than a band of cloud and the odd shower. this morning still rain moving across scotland, some heavy, by 9am, out of northern ireland, we will have
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brighter spells here but showers. rain moving across northern england, wales and south—west england. the cloud will build ahead of the weather front, turning sunshine hazy, brighter spells will be across south—east england and also east anglia where we will have the highest temperatures. as the weather front pushes east, behind it, for scotla nd front pushes east, behind it, for scotland and northern ireland, it will brighten up, sunny spells, but also showers and some of those could be thundery. temperatures, not into the walmart airfor all of be thundery. temperatures, not into the walmart air for all of us yet, that happens tomorrow. —— the warmer air. it will be windy, blustery, especially in the west around the irish sea and the scottish islands, gusts up to gale force. pollen levels today are high in eastern england. through this evening and
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overnight, a weather front will not be much more than a band of cloud and it will turn south and then reverse and go back north again, some clear spells, but not particularly cold. tomorrow we start off on particularly cold. tomorrow we start offona particularly cold. tomorrow we start off on a fairly cloudy note but it will be improving from the south. the weather front will rejuvenate for a the weather front will rejuvenate fora time, the weather front will rejuvenate for a time, producing the weather front will rejuvenate fora time, producing rain the weather front will rejuvenate for a time, producing rain across northern ireland and scotland, but it will eventually clear allowing sunny skies to develop for all of us. tomorrow it is likely to be 24 in the south and continuing to climb as we pushed north, but right behind the front, not a swarm. thursday, temperatures continue to climb —— not as warm. if you are wondering how long this will last, into the weekend, although temperatures will come down a little bit, subtle change in the wind direction, still looking at temperatures above average for this stage of april.
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thank you. let's get more on our top story, the government's apology to the so—called windrush generation, carribean migrants who came to the uk decades ago, and were recently told they were here illegally. joining us now is david lidington, minister for the cabinet office. thank you forjoining us. a bit of clarity. as the government know at this stage whether or not some people may have been deported because of this? we have no evidence of any cases of that kind but the home secretary has instructed officials to double—check by going back through the records. what do you make of this apology? do you think it will be enough? it is not just an apology, but she was right to make the apology, we think a relatively small number of people who are perfectly entitled to be in this country but have never previously regularised their status because they have not needed to apply for passports in the past and
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they have been treated badly. the home secretary was right to apologise and she did that on the half of the government but she has gone further, she has set up a new unit in the home office, 20 people to start with, who will work with people in this category, the windrush generation, came to britain in the 60s as children, perfectly lawfully, they have remained here lawfully, they have remained here lawfully, working, paying taxes, but they have not gone through the bureaucratic form filling hurdles to have the formal regularisation of the status. the new unit will help those people through the system so that we avoid any of the ghastly errors happening in the future. we understand some people may have lost jobs, they may have lost their homes, not getting access to health care, what about dealing with the impact as well of what has happened? i would encourage anyone who is in that situation to make contact with
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this unit in the home office as quickly as possible because the home secretary said people will have reasonable legal costs reimbursed, the fifa regularising your status in the fifa regularising your status in the country will be waived in respect of these people —— the fee for regularising. if people have lost out in other ways, they need to bring it to the attention of the home office. this can be devastating for people involved and frightening, what sort of time are you putting on this, getting these through the system ? this, getting these through the system? the plan is and the remit the unit has been given is that once the unit has been given is that once the cases brought to them, they should be aiming to resolve it within two weeks and the unit will be able to rove across government departments to look at records they might have. for example, somebody, they may not be able to remember different employers they have had over the years, but the home office unit will be able to go to look at
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national insurance records, the department of welfare and say, can we look at the pension contributions records or you may have? to draw up a picture rapidly of this person's presence in the country and get the decision taken. who is responsible for the current mess? in 2012, theresa may was home secretary and she announced this hostile environment for billy gunn immigrants. -- for illegal immigrants. -- for illegal immigrants. the people living here perfectly legally, the nationality law in the uk changed in 1971, in the years since then, under different governments, we think most people of the windrush generation have actually applied for passports for some other reason and they have gone to the home office and got formal confirmation and regularisation of their status, they have the document to prove it. we are now finding a small number of people getting on a bit in the
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yea rs, late people getting on a bit in the years, late in korea's or retirement, running into difficulties. as the home secretary said yesterday, probably the home office which is handling literally millions of individual immigration cases every year was focused on getting those through the system, handling them in as rapid a time as possible, to give people answers by a deadline, and with this group of people, what we needed was individual care and attention, more discretion. she has put in place the system to ensure that now happens. and she has apologised. she talked specifically, the home office to obsessed with policy and not how it affects individuals, a problem at the heart of the home office? inherent tension between a system where you are handling very large numbers of cases, just last year, you were looking at nearly 2.75
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million visas being issued by the home office and there are lots of other immigration cases as well that did not need visas. you tend to look at things as systems, how do we have at things as systems, how do we have a system in place to get the cases decided in a reasonable time so people get answers to get on with their lives? what we recognise and amber rudd has recognised with this group of people, perfectly entitled to be in the uk, something horrible has gone wrong here, those people need individualised attention to their cases, that is why we have the new casework unit to help them through the system. on payments, the shadow home secretary, diane abbott, saying the government should consider compensation for anyone deported, if you find anyone, do you agree with that? the first thing is to see whether there are people who have either in extremis been deported or the examples you
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suggested to me might have had difficulties over employment or benefit payments as a consequence of what went wrong, they need to bring this to the attention of the new unit as soon as possible. they can do so directly or go through their mp or another representative and the unit is going to try to sort this out within two weeks, the remit they have been given. they will get money back for that? i do not want to speculate about individual cases, but i would certainly hope, the home secretary has said people would be compensated fully reasonable legal costs a nd compensated fully reasonable legal costs and fees would be waived and i would encourage people who feel they have lost out financially take it to the home office unit and we can get the home office unit and we can get the case looked at in detail. can we also talk about syria and air strikes and whether or not parliament should be consulted?
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another discussion about this in parliament later. do you think that needs to be looked at, whether parliament should be consulted before air strikes are considered? the key principle is that the government, whether labour or conservative, they have to be able to ta ke conservative, they have to be able to take decisions, sometimes at very short notice, and try to maintain an element of tactical surprise. and then report parliament. yesterday then report parliament. yesterday the pm was answering questions for about three hours following her statement, she then attended much of the following debate and responded to the debate at the end and she will be speaking again in the debate in the house of commons today, so nobody can accuse this prime minister of shying away from parliament, but going back to last week, in a situation working with allies were the humanitarian grounds, the legal grounds for our intervention, depend in part on the intervention, depend in part on the intervention being very limited in
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scope, said that takes you want a discussion of targets, and explaining they are very limited specific targets related to syria's chemical weapons capability, we couldn't have got into that discussion about selection of targets in front of the house of commons. if we had, syria has some of the best air defences anywhere in the world, they would have switched all the air defence resource to the targets and it would have put our airmen at significantly greater risk than the risk being counted through the mission in any case, it would not have been responsible for the government to do. equally it would have been very hard for us as the government, impossible, to share with parliament all of the intelligence evidence on which ministers were able to make an assessment about both the targeting strategy, but also the culpability of the syrian regime for the chemical weapons attack that took
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place last week. david lidington, thank you. it will be discussed again in the house of commons today. thank you for your time. an enzyme that breaks some plastic has been engineered by scientists. it could reduce from centuries today is the time it takes for plastic to decompose making the material is truly recyclable. ben is out and about in oxfordshire. incredible stuff, isn't it? the idea there could be an enzyme that breaks down the plastic meaning it can be reused, it would break down plastic bottles, plastic trays that we use but at the moment they are cluttering up our oceans. there are some staggering figures. 40 million bottles are used in the uk every year. a staggering number of those end up in landfill. we recyclejust 60% of them so clearly there is a big campaign to get us to recycle
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more. it is the way the recycling is done because at the moment you can't make a plastic arkle into another plastic claw, it has to be used for something else, so man—made carpets or man—made fibres, not another bottle but this process would allow it to separate into its component parts so you can use it to make new plastic. a lot of big companies have signed up to this initiative including coca—cola, unilever, nestle. they want to recycle more. it has a lot of backing but the crucial thing is how it works. this facility in oxfordshire is allowing scientists to look at it in more detail and speed up the process using high—tech kit. with me is john. you've been behind this. and you are a campaign against plastic waste. how does this process work? a lot of the papers say it was discovered by accident but that isn't true, isn't it? it almost is. when we saw this enzyme discovered,
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we wa nted when we saw this enzyme discovered, we wanted to understand it, understand how bacteria evolved to eat a man—made substance. we did some experiments to figure out how it worked, we changed some of the enzyme and unexpectedly we made a better enzyme which is why fundamental science is so exciting because you never quite know what you're going to get. when we talk about enzymes, tiny, little things, but why do you need a facility of this size? the smaller the thing you wa nt to this size? the smaller the thing you want to look at, the bigger the facility you need to look at. it has these amazingly bright x—ray that allow us to see atoms which is what we need in order to see this enzyme. how revolutionary is this? could this mean plastic disappears from the oceans and landfill? how far along are we? it'll take a while but we already know plastic persists in the oceans for hundreds of years but this bacteria can diejested in weeks and in the lab in days. if we work together as a big team with
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industry, what i reckon we can get into ours. sian, you campaign against a lot of plastic waste. how excited i buy this breakthrough?” am really excited. i was talking to john earlier. he has a ten—month—old daughter because this is all about the next generation. this is future technology that will help us deal with future plastic. what it won't help us with is the 6—.3 billion tonnes of plastic that exists somewhere on tonnes of plastic that exists somewhere on our tonnes of plastic that exists somewhere on our planet today, in our fields, soils and oceans. there isa our fields, soils and oceans. there is a new our fields, soils and oceans. there is a new awareness we are our fields, soils and oceans. there is a new awareness we are using too much and not enough of it is being recycled but the problem is it is very difficult to recycle all of that, and a practical use. because plastic right now you only ever down cycle. this myth of a wine bottle becoming another bottle is not the reality. aluminium cans are very
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well and heavily recycled on the other hand. ourdream well and heavily recycled on the other hand. our dream is that rather than perpetuate anything or even ta ke than perpetuate anything or even take this amazing technology now to think here is a reason why we can continue to use plastic in this crazy, bonkers way we are right now, we are addicted to plastic. so our campaign is just to we are addicted to plastic. so our campaign isjust to say let's we are addicted to plastic. so our campaign is just to say let's turn off the plastic tap. we don't really need to package our food and drink thatis need to package our food and drink that is going to be with us for a matter of days in a material that was such a miracle that exists is forever. ok, sian and john, nice to see you both, thank you for explaining that. much more to talk about, looking about the practical uses of it. using less and finding ways of dealing with the plastic that we've to god. more from us but first let's get the news, travel and weather wherever you're watching. good morning, i'm asad ahmad.
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once again this morning, there's news of a teenager being stabbed to death, this time in east london.
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